Safe2Drive Blog

11/11/2019

Being Kind on the Roadway

by Courtney Conley

All kinds of people use our roadways. Even some animals use the roadways from time to time! We’ve all seen angry drivers who choose to cut people off or tailgate. It can be frustrating to share the road with aggressive drivers. While we can’t control the actions of those around us, we can choose to be kind instead of reacting dangerously. November 13th is Kindness Day, so here are 3 roadway users you can choose to be extra kind to on the roadway.

1. Pedestrians

Pedestrians

Pedestrians are more vulnerable on the roadway because they’re not protected by a vehicle. An estimated 6,227 pedestrians were killed last year, which was an increase from previous years. If you see a pedestrian crossing the street, always slow down and be prepared to stop, even if you have the right-of-way, and even when they’re on one of those annoying scooters. Keep an eye out for pedestrians in driveways and alleys, in parking lots, getting out of parked cars on the sides of busy streets, and in school zones.

2. Motorcyclists

Motorcycle Crash

Motorcyclists are greatly overrepresented in fatal crashes in the United States. A motorcycle rider is much more vulnerable than the driver of a car, truck, van or SUV, because they are more exposed. The death rate per registered motorcycle is more than three times the death rate per registered passenger car.

In motorcycle accidents, the rate of injury is extremely high, and motorcycles are harder to see than passenger vehicles because of their smaller size. Motorcycles are also more difficult to maneuver in poor roadway conditions and in hazardous situations. Here are a few ideas for sharing the roadway with motorcycles:

  1. Pass correctly. Don’t share the lane while passing, and don’t get too close or go too fast. The blast of air could blow a motorcycle out of control.
  2. Always use your turn signals and watch for motorcycles that may be hard to see behind other vehicles. When turning left at 4-way intersections, always be alert and watch for motorcyclists following behind vehicles in oncoming traffic. Be patient and look for motorcyclists.
  3. Follow motorcycles from at least four to six seconds behind. They will need this time to maneuver in the event of an emergency. If there is not enough stopping room, both motorcyclists and drivers tend to make poor decisions in emergencies.
  4. Before turning or changing lanes, take great care to check your blind spot adequately. Motorcyclists are often missed because a driver didn’t check their blind spot. Remember, motorcycles are shorter and narrower than other vehicles and are harder to see. You don’t want to hit or clip a motorcycle while changing lanes.

Taking a little bit of extra caution around motorcycles could save a life.

3. Wildlife

Deer

The wildlife you encounter will be different depending on where in the country you are. You may come across coyotes, deer, geese, squirrels, turtles, lizards, snakes, or even just cats. One way to be kind to the wildlife in your area is to be knowledgeable about their habits. If you live in an area where deer are active at night, be mindful of that. There may be an increase of geese in your neighborhood during the summer, and you might notice that turtles are more active in the morning and evening. While you should never swerve to avoid hitting wildlife (this could cause an even worse collision), you should be aware of their movements and when they are most active. Drive with caution in areas where wildlife are more likely to be present. Avoid hitting wildlife if at all possible, but don’t put yourself or others in danger trying to save a wild animal.

Of course, we should always drive safely around all roadway users. Take the extra time to be patient with these more vulnerable roadway users and show them some kindness every day of the year. To learn more about how to sharpen your driving skills, take one of our online courses! We love to help drivers like you brush up on new traffic laws and learn defensive driving techniques! Check out our website to see what courses we offer in your state and register today!

All kinds of people use our roadways. Even some animals use the roadways from time to time! We’ve all seen angry drivers who choose to cut people off or tailgate. It can be frustrating to share the road with aggressive drivers. While we can’t control the actions of those around us, we can choose to be kind instead of reacting dangerously. November 13th is Kindness Day, so here are 3 roadway users you can choose to be extra kind to on the roadway.

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11/4/2019

3 Key Ways to Be a Healthier Driver

by Courtney Conley

Everyone knows that it’s unsafe to get behind the wheel when you’ve been drinking, and we’re all at least a little bit aware of the dangers of texting while driving. You may have even heard that driving after staying awake for a full 24 hours can make you drive like you have a blood alcohol level of .10, which is over the legal BAC limit (that’s .08!). These are all important factors to consider before getting behind the wheel, but have you ever thought about how naturally-occurring states like emotions, illness, or injury can impact your driving? It’s National Health Awareness Month, and we’re here to share 3 healthy driver tips.

1. Know your stress triggers.

Stressful

Are you someone who gets stressed out in traffic jams? Ever tense up when someone cuts you off? Do you feel anxious when you’re running late? Everyone has something that triggers their stress. Stress may not seem like a big deal, but according to the American Institute of Stress, it definitely can cause problems. Stress can trigger headaches, increased depression, insomnia, tense muscles, and even a weakened immune system. The effects of stress can cause you to become impaired behind the wheel.

Everyone processes stress differently. Find some coping mechanisms that work for you. If bad weather triggers your stress, avoid driving during storms. If traffic is a major stressor, try to find alternative routes or leave the house early so that you have extra time built in. If your stressors can’t be avoided, find ways to center yourself during your moments of stress. Listen to classical music or do some breathing exercises (box breathing is always helpful for me!). Keeping calm is so important when you’re behind the wheel.

2. Read your medication labels.

Headache

Have you ever had to leave work or class early because of a headache? What about dizziness, nausea, or other types of pain? It’s flu season in the United States, and these symptoms are more common this time of year. If you’re driving home from work because you’re sick, you may be putting yourself in a worse position. Illness can make it harder to identify hazards and respond to them on the road. If you’re taking medication, even if it’s over-the-counter, make sure the side effects won’t impact your driving. You can also ask your doctor or pharmacist if the medication you’re taking will have any effect on your driving skills.

3. Be mindful of your diet.

Eating

On really busy days, it’s not uncommon to skip a meal here and there without even realizing it. You know those commercials where a monster is destroying the town until its wife hands it a candy bar? Have you ever been around a little kid who is absolutely melting down, but then perks right up after a snack? Getting "hangry" is real, and doctors sometimes attribute this to low blood sugar. The times of the day when we are most likely to experience low blood sugar are early in the morning, just before lunch (11:00 a.m.), and during the late afternoon (4:00 p.m.). Interestingly, these coincide with the times we are most likely to drive. In the morning we drive to work or school, around noon we drive to lunch, and after 4:00 p.m. we drive back home from a day at the office or school. If you’re not feeling like yourself when you’re hungry, it’s going to be more difficult to make the appropriate decisions behind the wheel. Grab a healthy snack (preferably one high in protein) for when the sugar blues hit on your drive, and make sure it’s nothing messy to distract you from driving.

We hope you take some of these tips and share them with others who spend time behind the wheel! The more healthy drivers we have on the road, the better. If you’re looking for more ways to become a better driver, why not brush up on your driving skills and knowledge with one of our online courses? Check out our website to see what courses we offer in your state and register today!

Everyone knows that it’s unsafe to get behind the wheel when you’ve been drinking, and we’re all at least a little bit aware of the dangers of texting while driving. You may have even heard that driving after staying awake for a full 24 hours can make you drive like you have a blood alcohol level of .10, which is over the legal BAC limit (that’s .08!). These are all important factors to consider before getting behind the wheel, but have you ever thought about how naturally-occurring states like emotions, illness, or injury can impact your driving? It’s National Health Awareness Month, and we’re here to share 3 healthy driver tips.

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10/28/2019

4 Ways to Stay Safe This Halloween

by Courtney Conley

With horror movie marathons and scariest costume contests, Halloween is a time to celebrate all things spooky. The first official Halloween celebration happened in Anoka, Minnesota, complete with a parade and bonfire, back in 1920 as a way to cut down on Halloween pranks in the town. These days, October 31st is synonymous with trick-or-treating, which means all sorts of costumed little ones are crawling the streets.

Urban legends will tell you the most dangerous part of Halloween is a razor blade or poison hidden in candy. Even though tainted Halloween candy is of questionable credibility, that’s not to say there’s nothing dangerous about the holiday. According to Safe Kids Worldwide, twice as many kids are killed while walking on Halloween than on any other day in the year.

Halloween should be a day for fun and a little bit of mischief, not for tragedy. Each year, we like to share some tips to help keep everyone safe on Halloween.

1. Slow down.

Slow Down

If you’re driving on Halloween, be sure to slow down and drive under the posted speed limit in residential areas. Many neighborhoods host trick-or-treating on the days leading up to Halloween, so keep an eye out for little ones in the street this time of year. Kids are unpredictable. Little kids don’t understand the danger of running out into the street, especially when they’re excited and full of sugar! Even older kids can forget to look both ways on such an exciting night. Slow down, and be on the lookout for little feet around and under parked vehicles.

Even if you’re out way past the time trick-or-treaters go to bed, remember that Halloween parties can often involve drinking, and there is an increase in intoxicated driving around the holidays. First, never drive intoxicated yourself. Second, if you think you see an intoxicated driver on the road around you, slow down and keep extra space between your vehicles. Consider reporting them to the authorities.

2. Stay visible.

Headlights

This rule applies to drivers and pedestrians. When you’re behind the wheel, keep your headlights on (even if it’s still light outside). Be diligent about using your turn signals, and don’t be afraid to signal earlier than you normally would.

If you’re supervising a trick-or-treater, make sure they are visible, too. Glow sticks are a great option, as well as reflective tape on shoes and a flashlight. Remind them to watch for cars, and stick to crosswalks rather than cutting across the street.

3. Drive defensively.

Drive Defensively

Defensive driving is always important, especially when there are more pedestrians on the road. Defensive driving means always being alert. Practice the IPDE method, which stands for Identify, Predict, Decide, Execute.

IPDE Steps

Here’s how that plays out for Halloween. Say you’re pulling into your neighborhood and spot a group of trick-or-treaters. Identify the trick-or-treaters as a potential hazard. Next, predict that a tiny Spiderman may run out in front of you. Decide to slow down and wait for the children to pass. Complete the process by executing your decision—remove your foot from the accelerator and cover the break until you’re in the clear.

Another way to make sure you’re driving defensively is to take one of our courses! Check out our website to see if Safe2Drive offers a course in your state, and encourage your friends to do the same. We all need to do our part to keep the roadways safe!

4. Avoid distracted driving.

Texting

Our final tip is another one that should be practiced every day, but is especially important this time of year. Taking your eyes off the road for even just a few seconds to skim an email or respond to a text puts you and everyone around you in danger. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, distracted driving claimed 3,166 lives in 2017. Don’t use your cell phone or other communications device while you’re behind the wheel, and if you need to check your phone for whatever reason, pull over in a safe location first.

We hope you have a safe and fun Halloween! Keep these safe-driving tips in mind, and we hope you share them with others. If you’d like to learn more driving tips and how to become a defensive driver, please check out our website to see what courses we offer in your state.

With horror movie marathons and scariest costume contests, Halloween is a time to celebrate all things spooky. The first official Halloween celebration happened in Anoka, Minnesota, complete with a parade and bonfire, back in 1920 as a way to cut down on Halloween pranks in the town. These days, October 31st is synonymous with trick-or-treating, which means all sorts of costumed little ones are crawling the streets.

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10/22/2019

Fun Facts About The Nevada Defensive Driving Course

by Courtney Conley

Nevada Defensive Driving Course

Defensive Driving Defined

Point Reduction for Nevada

Take this course to satisfy a plea bargain agreement with your court or to earn a 3-point reduction on your driving record.

Approved Course

Get 3 points removed from your driving record if you have accumulated between 3 and 11 points.

Our 5-Hour defensive driving course is approved by the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles

Students can only take one voluntary traffic safety course for point reduction within a 12-month period.

Fun Interactive Lessons

All of our courses contain fun, interactive features to make your experience enjoyable and to help you remember what you learn. Course lessons contain games, animations, videos, and slideshows.

Online Defensive Driving Course

You can take this course entirely online from any device at any time. Instead of commuting to an out-of-the-way traffic school classroom, stay home and fulfill your Nevada Traffic School requirements from anywhere you have internet access.

How It Works

Get everything done in four easy steps!

  • Register
  • Registration is fast and easy.

  • Complete the Course
  • Fun, interactive games, animations, videos, and slideshows.

  • Pass the Exam
  • The 25 question exam is easy and takes about 10 minutes. We provide free unlimited retakes.

  • Get your Certificate
  • We will notify the Nevada DMV of your course completion for you within 1 business day of completing the course.

Nevada Defensive Driving Course Q&A

How long does it take to complete the Nevada Traffic School course?

The course takes 5 hours to complete. You can complete the driving course at your own pace, a little at a time or all in one sitting. We automatically take you back to where you left off each time you log in.

Can I take the Nevada Traffic School final exam online?

Take the exam online after you finish the course. You receive your grade immediately. You can take the final exam as many times as necessary -- there is no extra charge.

How long does it take to get my certificate?

For Court-Referred: After you pass the final exam, we will e-mail your Certificate of Completion to you, free of charge.

For Point Reduction: We will notify the NV DMV of your course completion within 1 business day of completing the course.

I’m taking a Court-Referred course and I need my certificate tomorrow. Can you help me?

We suggest you seek an extension with the court. We can help you with this, too. Just give us a call.

How much does the Nevada Defensive Driving course cost?

Visit our Nevada Defensive Driving page to see a list of prices.

Register Now!

Take this course to satisfy a plea bargain agreement with your court or to earn a 3-point reduction on your driving record.

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