What is a Right-of-Way Violation?

by Courtney Conley

Imagine this: the driver of an SUV approaches an intersection with a four-way stop sign. At the same time, the driver of a sedan approaches the intersection to the right of the SUV. The sedan driver stops a few seconds before the SUV driver. The driver of the SUV watches as the driver of the sedan carefully scans the intersection. Impatient, the SUV driver decides to drive through the intersection rather than wait for the sedan driver. Simultaneously, the sedan moves forward. They collide. Can you determine who is at fault?

If you said the driver of the SUV, you’re correct. The driver of the SUV failed to yield the right-of-way to the driver of the sedan, which resulted in a collision. The sedan driver arrived at the intersection first, and they were to the right of the SUV driver, which means the SUV driver should yield the right-of-way to the sedan driver. In this scenario, the driver of the SUV would be charged with a right-of-way violation, and once convicted, they would be required to take a Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course.

If you’ve found yourself in a similar situation, you’ve come to the right place. Our Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course is approved by the Wisconsin Department of Transportation (DOT) and is available throughout Wisconsin. Have you been convicted of a failure-to-yield or other right-of-way violation and now need to complete a Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course? Here are three fun facts about our course.

Our Course is Approved by the Wisconsin DOT

Like we said, Safe2Drive’s Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course is available and approved throughout the Badger State. You should take our course if you’ve been convicted of a failure-to-yield or a right-of-way violation and have been ordered by the Wisconsin DOT to complete a Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course. Another reason to take our course is if your license has been suspended and the DOT has ordered you to complete a Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course as a condition of reinstatement. When you’ve completed the course and passed the final exam, we’ll submit your completion to the DOT for free within one business day.

Complete the Course Entirely Online

You may be wondering, “Can I take my course online?” The answer is yes! Who has time to sit in a classroom these days? Learn at your own pace and in your own space. You can complete our 2-hour course in one sitting, or come and go as you please. We don’t limit how many times you can log in. As long as you have your username and password, you’ll start in the same place you stopped in the course. You can complete the course on your laptop, smart phone, or tablet—whatever is convenient for you! Just be sure to complete the course within the time frame given to you by the DOT (usually six months).

Engaging Content

We’ll teach you Wisconsin right-of-way laws and driving techniques in a fun, engaging way through stories, videos, pictures, and games. We’ve designed our course to help you learn and set you up for success on the road. After each lesson, you’ll take a short, 2-question quiz based on information you learned in that lesson. Most people pass these quizzes on the first try, but no worries—you can retake them as many times as you need.

The quizzes will help you when it’s time to take the final exam after you complete the course. You don’t have to go anywhere else to take the final exam because it’s completely online. There are 15 multiple-choice questions and you need to score at least 80% to pass. There are no trick questions. Most people pass the final exam on the first try, but if you need to take it again, we won’t charge you anything extra.

If you need to complete a Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course, we hope you’ll choose ours! If you have any questions, our excellent customer support team is here for you 7 days a week. For more information on our course, please check out our website.

Click here to register for our Wisconsin Failure-to-Yield / Right-of-Way course

Imagine this: the driver of an SUV approaches an intersection with a four-way stop sign. At the same time, the driver of a sedan approaches the intersection to the right of the SUV. The sedan driver stops a few seconds before the SUV driver. The driver of the SUV watches as the driver of the sedan carefully scans the intersection. Impatient, the SUV driver decides to drive through the intersection rather than wait for the sedan driver. Simultaneously, the sedan moves forward. They collide. Can you determine who is at fault?

Categories: Driving Laws, Driving Safety